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Co-circulation and co-infections of all dengue virus serotypes in Hyderabad, India 2014

  • K. VADDADI (a1), C. GANDIKOTA (a1), P. K. JAIN (a1), V. S. V. PRASAD (a2) and M. VENKATARAMANA (a1)...

Summary

The burden of dengue virus infections increased globally during recent years. Though India is considered as dengue hyper-endemic country, limited data are available on disease epidemiology. The present study includes molecular characterization of dengue virus strains occurred in Hyderabad, India, during the year 2014. A total of 120 febrile cases were recruited for this study, which includes only children and 41 were serologically confirmed for dengue positive infections using non-structural (NS1) and/or IgG/IgM ELISA tests. RT-PCR, nucleotide sequencing and evolutionary analyses were carried out to identify the circulating serotypes/genotypes. The data indicated a high percent of severe dengue (63%) in primary infections. Simultaneous circulation of all four serotypes and co-infections were observed for the first time in Hyderabad, India. In total, 15 patients were co-infected with more than one dengue serotype and 12 (80%) of them had severe dengue. One of the striking findings of the present study is the identification of serotype Den-1 as the first report from this region and this strain showed close relatedness to the Thailand 1980 strains but not to any of the strains reported from India until now. Phylogenetically, all four strains of the present study showed close relatedness to the strains, which are reported to be high virulent.

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: M. Venkataramana, Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, Telangana State, India. (Email: mvrsl@uohyd.ernet.in)

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Co-circulation and co-infections of all dengue virus serotypes in Hyderabad, India 2014

  • K. VADDADI (a1), C. GANDIKOTA (a1), P. K. JAIN (a1), V. S. V. PRASAD (a2) and M. VENKATARAMANA (a1)...

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