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Clinical, laboratory and epidemiological aspects of HPV infection in a low-income population from South Bahia, Brazil

  • S. R. GADELHA (a1), D. M. V. SOARES-BARRETO (a1), G. B. COSTA (a1) (a2), V. C. N. LEAL (a3), L. G. S. GOMES (a1), U. R. SANTOS (a1), G. C. S. FERREIRA (a1), L. D. CARVALHO (a1), S. M. V. SORAES-ALMEIDA (a1), M. A. G. MELLO (a4), A. P. M. MARIANO (a1), S. M. B. SOUSA (a5), A. R. VAGO (a6) and L. J. MARIN (a1)...

Summary

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the Southern region of the State of Bahia, evaluating the performance of alternative complementary methods for cervical lesion detection. Cervical samples from women who attended healthcare units were collected and diagnosed by visual inspection, cervical cytology and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Moreover, hemi-nested PCR was performed to detect different HPV genotypes. The prevalence of HPV infection was 47·7%, with genotype 16 detected in most cases. Infection was associated with dyspareunia and bleeding (P < 0·001, odds ratio (OR) 5·6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·815–11·14) and hormonal contraceptive use (P = 0·007, OR 2·33, 95% CI 1·25–4·34). There was a positive correlation between positive PCR and positive visual inspection, cervical cytology and symptoms reported. Furthermore, visual inspection was twice as specific, and had a greater positive predictive value than cytology. We showed a high prevalence of HPV infection in Southern Bahia, with HPV 16 being the most common type, and visual inspection being most effective at detecting HPV lesions, corroborating the suggestion that it can be applied in routine gynecologic examinations for low-income populations.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: S. R. Gadelha, Laboratório de Farmacogenômica e Epidemiologia Molecular, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Campus Soane Nazaré de Andrade – Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, Salobrinho, CEP 45662-900, Ilhéus – Bahia, Brazil. (Email: sandragadelha@hotmail.com)

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These authors contributed equally to this work

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References

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Keywords

Clinical, laboratory and epidemiological aspects of HPV infection in a low-income population from South Bahia, Brazil

  • S. R. GADELHA (a1), D. M. V. SOARES-BARRETO (a1), G. B. COSTA (a1) (a2), V. C. N. LEAL (a3), L. G. S. GOMES (a1), U. R. SANTOS (a1), G. C. S. FERREIRA (a1), L. D. CARVALHO (a1), S. M. V. SORAES-ALMEIDA (a1), M. A. G. MELLO (a4), A. P. M. MARIANO (a1), S. M. B. SOUSA (a5), A. R. VAGO (a6) and L. J. MARIN (a1)...

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