Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of acute respiratory virus infections in Vietnamese children

  • D. N. TRAN (a1) (a2) (a3), Q. D. TRINH (a3), N. T. K. PHAM (a3), M. P. VU (a2), M. T. HA (a4), T. Q. N. NGUYEN (a1) (a4), S. OKITSU (a1) (a3), S. HAYAKAWA (a3), M. MIZUGUCHI (a1) and H. USHIJIMA (a1) (a3)...

Summary

Information about viral acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is essential for prevention, diagnosis and treatment, but it is limited in tropical developing countries. This study described the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of ARIs in children hospitalized in Vietnam. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected from children with ARIs at Ho Chi Minh City Children's Hospital 2 between April 2010 and May 2011 in order to detect respiratory viruses by polymerase chain reaction. Viruses were found in 64% of 1082 patients, with 12% being co-infections. The leading detected viruses were human rhinovirus (HRV; 30%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; 23·8%), and human bocavirus (HBoV; 7·2%). HRV was detected all year round, while RSV epidemics occurred mainly in the rainy season. Influenza A (FluA) was found in both seasons. The other viruses were predominant in the dry season. HRV was identified in children of all age groups. RSV, parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, PIV3 and HBoV, and FluA were detected predominantly in children aged <6 months, 6–12 months, 12–24 months, and >24 months, respectively. Significant associations were found between PIV1 with croup (P < 0·005) and RSV with bronchiolitis (P < 0·005). HBoV and HRV were associated with hypoxia (P < 0·05) and RSV with retraction (P < 0·05). HRV, RSV, and HBoV were detected most frequently and they may increase the severity of ARIs in children.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of acute respiratory virus infections in Vietnamese children
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of acute respiratory virus infections in Vietnamese children
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of acute respiratory virus infections in Vietnamese children
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: H. Ushijima, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Nihon University, School of Medicine, 30-1 Oyaguchi-Kamicho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8610, Japan. (Email: ushijima-hiroshi@jcom.home.ne.jp)

References

Hide All
1. Liu, L, et al. Global, regional, and national causes of child mortality in 2000–13, with projections to inform post-2015 priorities: an updated systematic analysis. Lancet 2015; 385: 430440.
2. Fendrick, AM, et al. The economic burden of non-influenza-related viral respiratory tract infection in the United States. Archives of Internal Medicine 2003; 163: 487494.
3. Mahony, JB. Detection of respiratory viruses by molecular methods. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 2008; 21: 716747.
4. World Health Organization. Pocket book of hospital care for children: guidelines for the management of common illnesses with limited resources. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2005.
5. Bradley, JS, et al. The management of community-acquired pneumonia in infants and children older than 3 months of age: clinical practice guidelines by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2011; 53: e2576.
6. American Academy of Pediatrics Subcommittee on Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis. Diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis. Pediatrics 2006; 118: 17741793.
7. Zoorob, R, Sidani, M, Murray, J. Croup: an overview. American Family Physician 2011; 83: 10671073.
8. Yoshida, LM, et al. Viral pathogens associated with acute respiratory infections in central vietnamese children. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2010; 29: 7577.
9. Do, AH, et al. Viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections among hospitalized Vietnamese children in Ho Chi Minh City, 2004–2008. PLoS ONE 2011; 6: e18176.
10. Calvo, C, et al. Detection of new respiratory viruses in hospitalized infants with bronchiolitis: a three-year prospective study. Acta Paediatrica 2010; 99: 883887.
11. Midulla, F, et al. Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants. Archives of Disease in Childhood 2010; 95: 3541.
12. Tregoning, JS, Schwarze, J. Respiratory viral infections in infants: causes, clinical symptoms, virology, and immunology. Clinical Microbiology Reviews 2010; 23: 7498.
13. Weigl, JA, et al. The descriptive epidemiology of severe lower respiratory tract infections in children in Kiel, Germany. Klinische Padiatrie 2005; 217: 259267.
14. Guerrier, G, et al. Acute viral lower respiratory tract infections in Cambodian children: clinical and epidemiologic characteristics. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2013; 32: e813.
15. Tang, JW, Loh, TP. Correlations between climate factors and incidence – a contributor to RSV seasonality. Reviews in Medical Virology 2014; 24: 1534.
16. Chew, FT, et al. Seasonal trends of viral respiratory tract infections in the tropics. Epidemiology and Infection 1998; 121: 121128.
17. Virkki, R, et al. Differentiation of bacterial and viral pneumonia in children. Thorax 2002; 57: 438441.
18. Ruuskanen, O, et al. Viral pneumonia. Lancet 2011; 377: 12641275.
19. Goka, EA, et al. Single and multiple respiratory virus infections and severity of respiratory disease: a systematic review. Paediatric Respiratory Reviews 2014; 15: 363370.
20. Berkley, JA, et al. Viral etiology of severe pneumonia among Kenyan infants and children. Journal of the American Medical Association 2010; 303: 20512057.
21. Weber, MW, Mulholland, EK, Greenwood, BM. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in tropical and developing countries. Tropical medicine & international health 1998; 3: 268280.
22. Reed, G, et al. Epidemiology and clinical impact of parainfluenza virus infections in otherwise healthy infants and young children <5 years old. Journal of Infectious Diseases 1997; 175: 807813.
23. Hayden, FG. Rhinovirus and the lower respiratory tract. Reviews in Medical Virology 2004; 14: 1731.
24. Papadopoulos, NG, et al. Rhinoviruses infect the lower airways. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2000; 181: 18751884.
25. Kaiser, L, et al. Chronic rhinoviral infection in lung transplant recipients. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 2006; 174: 13921399.
26. Malmstrom, K, et al. Human rhinovirus in bronchial epithelium of infants with recurrent respiratory symptoms. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 2006; 118: 591596.
27. Mosser, AG, et al. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of rhinovirus infection in bronchial tissues. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 2005; 171: 645651.
28. Jartti, T, et al. Identification of respiratory viruses in asymptomatic subjects: asymptomatic respiratory viral infections. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2008; 27: 11031107.
29. Jartti, T, et al. Human bocavirus – the first 5 years. Reviews in Medical Virology 2012; 22: 4664.

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed