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Characteristics and TB treatment outcomes in TB patients with viral hepatitis, New York City, 2000–2010

  • G. BUSHNELL (a1) (a2), N. L. STENNIS (a1), A. M. DROBNIK (a1), D. C. PROOPS (a1), S. D. AHUJA (a1), K. BORNSCHLEGEL (a1) and J. FULD (a1)...

Summary

Literature surrounding the burden of and factors associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons with tuberculosis (TB) disease remains limited and focused on populations outside the USA. Cross-matched New York City (NYC) TB and viral hepatitis surveillance data were used to estimate the proportion of NYC adults diagnosed with TB from 2000 to 2010 with a report of viral hepatitis infection and to describe the impact of viral hepatitis infection on TB treatment completion and death. For 9512 TB patients, HCV infection was reported in 4·2% and HBV infection in 3·7%; <1% of TB patients had both HCV and HBV infection. The proportion of TB patients with HCV infection to die before TB treatment completion was larger than in TB patients without a viral hepatitis report (21% vs. 9%); this association remained when stratified by HIV status. There was no significant difference in death before treatment completion for TB patients with HBV infection compared to TB patients without a viral hepatitis report when stratified by HIV status. These findings reinforce the importance of hepatitis testing and providing additional support to TB patients with viral hepatitis infection.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: J. Fuld, PhD, Director, PCSI, Division of Disease Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 42–09 28th Street, 5th Floor, Queens, NY 11101, USA. (Email: jfuld@health.nyc.gov)

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