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Changing aetiology of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections at three medical centres in Taiwan, 2000–2011

  • C. C. LAI (a1), Y. H. CHEN (a2), S. H. LIN (a3) (a4), K. P. CHUNG (a5) (a6), W. H. SHENG (a5), W. C. KO (a7) and P. R. HSUEH (a5) (a6)...

Summary

This multicentre surveillance study was conducted to investigate the trends in incidence and aetiology of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections (HCA-BSIs) in Taiwan. From 2000 to 2011 a total of 56 830 HCA-BSIs were recorded at three medical centres, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were the most common pathogens isolated (n = 9465, 16·7%), followed by E. coli (n = 7599, 13·4%). The incidence of all HCA-BSIs in each and all hospitals significantly increased over the study period owing to the increase of aerobic Gram-positive cocci and Enterobacteriaceae by 4·2% and 3·6%, respectively. Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria, Bacteroides spp. and Candida spp. also showed an increase but there was a significant decline in the numbers of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. In conclusion, the incidence of HCA-BSIs in Taiwan is significantly increasing, especially for Enterobacteriaceae and aerobic Gram-positive cocci.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr P. R. Hsueh, Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, No 7, Chung-Shan South Road, Taipei, Taiwan. (Email: hsporen@ntu.edu.tw) [P. R. Hsueh] (Email: winston3415@gmail.com) [W. C. Ko]

References

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