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Changes in the seroprevalence of cysticercosis in suspected patients in Chandigarh, India between 1998 and 2014: analysis of 17 years of data

  • L. J. ROBERTSON (a1), H. JOSHI (a2), K. S. UTAAKER (a1), A. KUMAR (a2), S. CHAUDHARY (a2), K. GOYAL (a2) and R. SEHGAL (a2)...

Summary

Changes in seroprevalence of cysticercosis diagnosed in Chandigarh, India between 1998 and 2014 were investigated by extraction and analysis of data from records held at the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research in Chandigarh. Among the total number of samples for which cysticercosis had been suspected during this period (N = 9650), 1716 (17·8%) were seropositive. Adults were more likely to be seropositive than children, and women were more likely to be seropositive than men. In addition to there being fewer patients with suspicion of cysticercosis over the data analysis period, the proportion of patients seropositive also reduced significantly. Despite these reductions, which are probably associated with improved infrastructure and sanitation within Chandigarh, and despite meat consumption being relatively rare in this area, the extent of cysticercosis in this population remains problematic. Further efforts should be made to reduce transmission of this infection, with particular emphasis on women. Such efforts should follow the One Health concept, and involve medical efforts (including diagnosis and treatment of T. solium tapeworm carriers), veterinary efforts directed towards meat inspection and prevention of infection of pigs, and environmental health and sanitation engineers (to minimize environmental contamination with human waste).

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Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr L. J. Robertson, Parasitology Laboratory, Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology, Norwegian University of Life Sciences – School of Veterinary Medicine, Adamstuen Campus, PO Box 81466 Dep., 0033 Oslo, Norway. (Email: lucy.robertson@nmbu.no)

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Keywords

Changes in the seroprevalence of cysticercosis in suspected patients in Chandigarh, India between 1998 and 2014: analysis of 17 years of data

  • L. J. ROBERTSON (a1), H. JOSHI (a2), K. S. UTAAKER (a1), A. KUMAR (a2), S. CHAUDHARY (a2), K. GOYAL (a2) and R. SEHGAL (a2)...

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