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Cell-surface hydrophobicity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus

  • P. F. Schneider (a1) and T. V. Riley (a2)

Summary

The cell-surface hydrophobicity of 100 urinary isolates of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, cultured from symptomatic females in the general population, was assessed using a two-phase aqueous: hydrocarbon system. Relatively strong cell-surface hydrophobicity was exhibited by 79 isolates using the criteria employed, while only 2 of the remaining 21 isolates failed to demonstrate any detectable hydrophobicity. Cell-surface hydrophobicity may be a virulence factor of S. saprophyticus. important in adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. Additionally, the data support the concept that cell-surface hydrophobicity may be a useful predictor of clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci isoated from clinical sources.

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References

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Cell-surface hydrophobicity of Staphylococcus saprophyticus

  • P. F. Schneider (a1) and T. V. Riley (a2)

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