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Burden of community-onset bloodstream infection: a population-based assessment

  • K. B. LAUPLAND (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), D. B. GREGSON (a1) (a2) (a5), W. W. FLEMONS (a1) (a6), D. HAWKINS (a1) (a6), T. ROSS (a4) and D. L. CHURCH (a1) (a2) (a5)...

Summary

Although community-onset bloodstream infection (BSI) is recognized to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality, there is a paucity of population-based studies defining its overall burden. We conducted population-based laboratory surveillance for all community-onset BSI in the Calgary Health Region during 2000–2004. A total of 4467 episodes of community-onset BSI were identified for an overall annual incidence of 81·6/100 000. The three species, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were responsible for the majority of community-onset BSI; they occurred at annual rates of 25·8, 13·5, and 10·1/100 000, respectively. Overall 3445/4467 (77%) episodes resulted in hospital admission representing 0·7% of all admissions to major acute care hospitals. The subsequent hospital length of stay was a median of 9 (interquartile range, 5–15) days; the total days of acute hospitalization attributable to community-onset BSI was 51 146 days or 934 days/100 000 annually. Four hundred and sixty patients died in hospital for a case-fatality rate of 13%. Community-onset BSI is common and has a major patient and societal impact. These data support further efforts to reduce the burden of community-onset BSI.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr K. B. Laupland, Calgary Laboratory Services, Room 1W-415, #9, 3535 Research Road NW, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaT2L 2K8. (Email: kevin.laupland@calgaryhealthregion.ca)

References

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Burden of community-onset bloodstream infection: a population-based assessment

  • K. B. LAUPLAND (a1) (a2) (a3) (a4), D. B. GREGSON (a1) (a2) (a5), W. W. FLEMONS (a1) (a6), D. HAWKINS (a1) (a6), T. ROSS (a4) and D. L. CHURCH (a1) (a2) (a5)...

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