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Bovine tuberculosis: making a case for effective surveillance

  • C. PROBST (a1), C. FREULING (a1), I. MOSER (a2), L. GEUE (a1), H. KÖHLER (a2), F. J. CONRATHS (a1), H. HOTZEL (a3), E. M. LIEBLER-TENORIO (a3) and M. KRAMER (a1)...

Summary

In 2008, a cow with marked gross lesions suspicious for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) was identified by meat inspection at home slaughtering in north-western Germany. Epidemiological investigations led to the identification of another 11 affected farms with a total of 135 animals which reacted positive to the skin test. Eight affected farms had been in trade contact with the putative index farm. While the source for the initial introduction remained unknown, it was shown that all isolates tested shared the same molecular characteristics suggesting a common source of infection. The findings demonstrate that bTB can easily be transmitted via animal trade and may remain undetected for years in herds in the absence of tuberculin testing. Hence, we believe that bTB surveillance should not rely only on meat inspection, but on a combination of both meat inspection and intradermal tuberculin testing.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr C. Probst, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Seestrasse 55, 16868 Wusterhausen, Germany. (Email: Carolina.Probst@fli.bund.de)

References

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Keywords

Bovine tuberculosis: making a case for effective surveillance

  • C. PROBST (a1), C. FREULING (a1), I. MOSER (a2), L. GEUE (a1), H. KÖHLER (a2), F. J. CONRATHS (a1), H. HOTZEL (a3), E. M. LIEBLER-TENORIO (a3) and M. KRAMER (a1)...

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