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Bloodstream yeast infections: a 15-month survey

  • D. SWINNE (a1), N. NOLARD (a1), P. VAN ROOIJ (a1) and M. DETANDT (a1)

Summary

A 15-month survey of 412 bloodstream yeast isolates from 54 Belgian hospitals was undertaken. Candida albicans was the most common species (47·3%) followed by C. glabrata (25·7%), C. parapsilosis (8·0%), C. tropicalis (6·8%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (5·1%). Common predisposing factors were antibacterial therapy (45%), hospitalization in intensive care units (34%), presence of in-dwelling catheters (32%), underlying cancer (23%) and major surgery (11%). Most patients had more than one predisposing factor. Fluconazole alone or in combination with another antifungal agent was the treatment of choice for 86·6% of the cases. Susceptibility testing revealed that 93·5% were susceptible to amphotericin B, 39·6% to itraconazole, 42·8% to fluconazole and 87% to voriconazole. Resistance to azoles was more common among C. glabrata isolates.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr D. Swinne, Scientific Institute of Public Health, Mycology Section, Wytsmanstreet, 14, 1050 Brussels, Belgium. (Email: dswinne@iph.fgov.be)

References

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Keywords

Bloodstream yeast infections: a 15-month survey

  • D. SWINNE (a1), N. NOLARD (a1), P. VAN ROOIJ (a1) and M. DETANDT (a1)

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