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Biotypes and serotypes of thermophilic campylobacters isolated from cattle, sheep and pig offal and other red meats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2009

F. J. Bolton
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston Infirmary, Meadow Street, Preston, Lancs, PR1 6PS
H. C. Dawkins
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston Infirmary, Meadow Street, Preston, Lancs, PR1 6PS
D. N. Hutchinson
Affiliation:
Public Health Laboratory, Preston Infirmary, Meadow Street, Preston, Lancs, PR1 6PS
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Summary

In this study we examined 730 faecal samples of offal (mainly liver), mince-meat and sausage meat collected from abattoirs and retail butchers' shops for campylobacters. Campylobacter jejuni or C. coli were isolated from 30·6, 10·5 and 6% of sheep, cattle and pig offal samples respectively. Specimens collected from abattoirs were, in general, more often contaminated than material obtained from retail butchers' shops. Only 1·4% of minced meats and sausage meats contained campylobacters. Most isolates (89·5%) were C. jejuni biotype 1 (Skirrow & Benjamin, 1980) of serotypes 1 and 2 (Penner & Hennessy, 1980). This study shows that animal offal is frequently contaminated with C. jejuni of biotypes and scrotypes commonly isolated from human beings with campylobacter enteritis.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1985

References

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