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Bat population genetics and Lyssavirus presence in Great Britain

  • G. C. SMITH (a1), J. N. AEGERTER (a1), T. R. ALLNUTT (a1), A. D. MacNICOLL (a1), J. LEARMOUNT (a1), A. M. HUTSON (a2) and H. ATTERBY (a1)...

Summary

Most lyssaviruses appear to have bat species as reservoir hosts. In Europe, of around 800 reported cases in bats, most were of European bat lyssavirus type 1 (EBLV-1) in Eptesicus serotinus (where the bat species was identified). About 20 cases of EBLV-2 were recorded, and these were in Myotis daubentonii and M. dasycneme. Through a passive surveillance scheme, Britain reports about one case a year of EBLV-2, but no cases of the more prevalent EBLV-1. An analysis of E. serotinus and M. daubentonii bat genetics in Britain reveals more structure in the former population than in the latter. Here we briefly review these differences, ask if this correlates with dispersal and movement patterns and use the results to suggest an hypothesis that EBLV-2 is more common than EBLV-1 in the UK, as genetic data suggest greater movement and regular immigration from Europe of M. daubentonii. We further suggest that this genetic approach is useful to anticipate the spread of exotic diseases in bats in any region of the world.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr G. C. Smith, The Food and Environment Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ, North Yorkshire, UK. (Email: graham.smith@fera.gsi.gov.uk)

References

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Keywords

Bat population genetics and Lyssavirus presence in Great Britain

  • G. C. SMITH (a1), J. N. AEGERTER (a1), T. R. ALLNUTT (a1), A. D. MacNICOLL (a1), J. LEARMOUNT (a1), A. M. HUTSON (a2) and H. ATTERBY (a1)...

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