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Bartonella infection in urban and rural dogs from the tropics: Brazil, Colombia, Sri Lanka and Vietnam

  • E. C. BRENNER (a1), B. B. CHOMEL (a1), O.-U. SINGHASIVANON (a1), D. Y. NAMEKATA (a1), R. W. KASTEN (a1), P. H. KASS (a1), J. A. CORTÉS-VECINO (a2), S. M. GENNARI (a3), R. P. RAJAPAKSE (a4), L. T. HUONG (a5) and J. P. DUBEY (a6)...

Summary

Dogs can be infected by a wide range of Bartonella spp., but limited studies have been conducted in tropical urban and rural dog populations. We aimed to determine Bartonella antibody prevalence in 455 domestic dogs from four tropical countries and detect Bartonella DNA in a subset of these dogs. Bartonella antibodies were detected in 38 (8·3%) dogs, including 26 (10·1%) from Colombia, nine (7·6%) from Brazil, three (5·1%) from Sri Lanka and none from Vietnam. DNA extraction was performed for 26 (63%) of the 41 seropositive and 10 seronegative dogs. Four seropositive dogs were PCR positive, including two Colombian dogs, infected with B. rochalimae and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, and two Sri Lankan dogs harbouring sequences identical to strain HMD described in dogs from Italy and Greece. This is the first detection of Bartonella infection in dogs from Colombia and Sri Lanka and identification of Bartonella strain HMD from Asia.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: B. B. Chomel, DVM, PhD. Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. (Email: bbchomel@ucdavis.edu)

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Epidemiology & Infection
  • ISSN: 0950-2688
  • EISSN: 1469-4409
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