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Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii exposure in captive wild canids in Brazil

  • D. A. FLEISCHMAN (a1), B. B. CHOMEL (a1), R. W. KASTEN (a1), M. R. ANDRÉ (a2), L. R. GONÇALVES (a2) and R. Z. MACHADO (a2)...

Summary

Wild canids are potential hosts for numerous species of Bartonella, yet little research has been done to quantify their infection rates in South America. We sought to investigate Bartonella seroprevalence in captive wild canids from 19 zoos in São Paulo and Mato Grosso states, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from 97 wild canids belonging to four different native species and three European wolves (Canis lupus). Indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing was performed to detect the presence of B. henselae, B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, B. clarridgeiae, and B. rochalimae. Overall, Bartonella antibodies were detected in 11 of the canids, including five (12·8%) of 39 crab-eating foxes (Cerdocyon thous), three (11·1%) of 27 bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), two (8·7%) of 23 maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) and one (12·5%) of eight hoary foxes (Lycalopex vetulus), with titres ranging from 1:64 to 1:512. Knowing that many species of canids make excellent reservoir hosts for Bartonella, and that there is zoonotic potential for all Bartonella spp. tested for, it will be important to conduct further research in non-captive wild canids to gain an accurate understanding of Bartonella infection in free-ranging wild canids in South America.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: B. B. Chomel, DVM, PhD, Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, VM3B, 1089 Veterinary Medicine Drive, Davis, CA 95616, USA. (Email: bbchomel@ucdavis.edu)

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Keywords

Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii exposure in captive wild canids in Brazil

  • D. A. FLEISCHMAN (a1), B. B. CHOMEL (a1), R. W. KASTEN (a1), M. R. ANDRÉ (a2), L. R. GONÇALVES (a2) and R. Z. MACHADO (a2)...

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