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Association between wetland presence and incidence of Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana infections in selected US sites, 2005–2011

  • J. Y. HUANG (a1), M. E. PATRICK (a1), J. MANNERS (a2), A. R. SAPKOTA (a3), K. J. SCHERZINGER (a4), M. TOBIN-D'ANGELO (a5), O. L. HENAO (a1), D. J. COLE (a1) and A. R. VIEIRA (a1)...

Summary

Salmonella causes an estimated 1·2 million illnesses annually in the USA. Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana (serotype Javiana) is the fourth most common serotype isolated from humans, with the majority of illnesses occurring in southeastern states. The percentage of wetland cover by wetland type and the average incidence rates of serotype Javiana infection in selected counties of the Foodborne Disease Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) were examined. This analysis explored the relationship between wetland environments and incidence in order to assess whether regional differences in environmental habitats may be associated with observed variations in incidence. Findings suggest that environmental habitats may support reservoirs or contribute to the persistence of serotype Javiana, and may frequently contribute to the transmission of infection compared with other Salmonella serotypes.

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      Association between wetland presence and incidence of Salmonella enterica serotype Javiana infections in selected US sites, 2005–2011
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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: J. Y. Huang, Centers for Disease Control, Enteric Disease Epidemiology Branch-FoodNet, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, MS C-09, Atlanta, GA 30033, USA. (Email: uzo0@cdc.gov)

References

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