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Assessment of population susceptibility to upcoming seasonal influenza epidemic strain using interepidemic emerging influenza virus strains

  • Lin-Lei Chen (a1), Wai-Lan Wu (a1), Wan-Mui Chan (a1), Carol H. Y. Fong (a1), Anthony C. K. Ng (a1), Jonathan D. Ip (a1), Lu Lu (a1), Thrimendra K. Dissanayake (a1), Xixia Ding (a2), Jian-Piao Cai (a1), Anna J. X. Zhang (a1), Sidney Tam (a3), Ivan F. N. Hung (a4) (a5), Kwok-Hung Chan (a1) (a5) (a6), Kwok-Yung Yuen (a1) (a5) (a6) (a7) and Kelvin K. W. To (a1) (a5) (a6) (a7)...

Abstract

Seasonal influenza virus epidemics have a major impact on healthcare systems. Data on population susceptibility to emerging influenza virus strains during the interepidemic period can guide planning for resource allocation of an upcoming influenza season. This study sought to assess the population susceptibility to representative emerging influenza virus strains collected during the interepidemic period. The microneutralisation antibody titers (MN titers) of a human serum panel against representative emerging influenza strains collected during the interepidemic period before the 2018/2019 winter influenza season (H1N1-inter and H3N2-inter) were compared with those against influenza strains representative of previous epidemics (H1N1-pre and H3N2-pre). A multifaceted approach, incorporating both genetic and antigenic data, was used in selecting these representative influenza virus strains for the MN assay. A significantly higher proportion of individuals had a ⩾four-fold reduction in MN titers between H1N1-inter and H1N1-pre than that between H3N2-inter and H3N2-pre (28.5% (127/445) vs. 4.9% (22/445), P < 0.001). The geometric mean titer (GMT) of H1N1-inter was significantly lower than that of H1N1-pre (381 (95% CI 339–428) vs. 713 (95% CI 641–792), P < 0.001), while there was no significant difference in the GMT between H3N2-inter and H3N2-pre. Since A(H1N1) predominated the 2018–2019 winter influenza epidemic, our results corroborated the epidemic subtype.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Kelvin To, E-mail: kelvinto@hku.hk

Footnotes

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These authors contribute equally.

Footnotes

References

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Assessment of population susceptibility to upcoming seasonal influenza epidemic strain using interepidemic emerging influenza virus strains

  • Lin-Lei Chen (a1), Wai-Lan Wu (a1), Wan-Mui Chan (a1), Carol H. Y. Fong (a1), Anthony C. K. Ng (a1), Jonathan D. Ip (a1), Lu Lu (a1), Thrimendra K. Dissanayake (a1), Xixia Ding (a2), Jian-Piao Cai (a1), Anna J. X. Zhang (a1), Sidney Tam (a3), Ivan F. N. Hung (a4) (a5), Kwok-Hung Chan (a1) (a5) (a6), Kwok-Yung Yuen (a1) (a5) (a6) (a7) and Kelvin K. W. To (a1) (a5) (a6) (a7)...

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