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Application of the multifactor dimensionality reduction method in evaluation of the roles of multiple genes/enzymes in multidrug-resistant acquisition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains

  • Z. YAO (a1) (a2), Y. PENG (a1) (a2), J. BI (a3), C. XIE (a4), X. CHEN (a5), Y. LI (a6), X. YE (a1) (a2) and J. ZHOU (a1) (a2)...

Summary

Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) infections are major threats to healthcare-associated infection control and the intrinsic molecular mechanisms of MDRPA are also unclear. We examined 348 isolates of P. aeruginosa, including 188 MDRPA and 160 non-MDRPA, obtained from five tertiary-care hospitals in Guangzhou, China. Significant correlations were found between gene/enzyme carriage and increased rates of antimicrobial resistance (P < 0·01). gyrA mutation, OprD loss and metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) presence were identified as crucial molecular risk factors for MDRPA acquisition by a combination of univariate logistic regression and a multifactor dimensionality reduction approach. The MDRPA rate was also elevated with the increase in positive numbers of those three determinants (P < 0·001). Thus, gyrA mutation, OprD loss and MBL presence may serve as predictors for early screening of MDRPA infections in clinical settings.

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Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr Z. Yao, Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Molecular Epidemiology, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, 510310 Guangzhou, China. (Email: zhjyao2001@yahoo.com)

References

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