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Analysis of the FoodNet case-control study of sporadic Salmonella serotype Enteritidis infections using persons infected with other Salmonella serotypes as the comparison group

  • A. C. VOETSCH (a1) (a2), C. POOLE (a1), C. W. HEDBERG (a3), R. M. HOEKSTRA (a2), R. W. RYDER (a1), D. J. WEBER (a1) (a4) and F. J. ANGULO (a2)...

Summary

Use of well persons as the comparison group for laboratory-confirmed cases of sporadic salmonellosis may introduce ascertainment bias into case-control studies. Data from the 1996–1997 FoodNet case-control study of laboratory-confirmed Salmonella serogroups B and D infection were used to estimate the effect of specific behaviours and foods on infection with Salmonella serotype Enteritidis (SE). Persons with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella of other serotypes acted as the comparison group. The analysis included 173 SE cases and 268 non-SE controls. SE was associated with international travel, consumption of chicken prepared outside the home, and consumption of undercooked eggs prepared outside the home in the 5 days prior to diarrhoea onset. SE phage type 4 was associated with international travel and consumption of undercooked eggs prepared outside the home. The use of ill controls can be a useful tool in identifying risk factors for sporadic cases of Salmonella.

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      Analysis of the FoodNet case-control study of sporadic Salmonella serotype Enteritidis infections using persons infected with other Salmonella serotypes as the comparison group
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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: Dr A. C. Voetsch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mailstop E46, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta GA 30333, USA. (Email: aav6@cdc.gov)

References

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