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Analysis of factors affecting the prognosis of COVID-19 patients and viral shedding duration

  • Jing Han (a1) (a2), Li-xia Shi (a1) (a3), Yi Xie (a2), Yong-jin Zhang (a1), Shu-ping Huang (a1), Jian-guo Li (a3), He-rong Wang (a3) and Shi-feng Shao (a3) (a4)...

Abstract

The clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 were analysed to determine the factors influencing the prognosis and virus shedding time to facilitate early detection of disease progression. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the relationships among prognosis, clinical characteristics and laboratory indexes. The predictive value of this model was assessed with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, calibration and internal validation. The viral shedding duration was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and the prognostic factors were analysed by univariate log-rank analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. A retrospective study was carried out with patients with COVID-19 in Tianjin, China. A total of 185 patients were included, 27 (14.59%) of whom were severely ill at the time of discharge and three (1.6%) of whom died. Our findings demonstrate that patients with an advanced age, diabetes, a low PaO2/FiO2 value and delayed treatment should be carefully monitored for disease progression to reduce the incidence of severe disease. Hypoproteinaemia and the fever duration warrant special attention. Timely interventions in symptomatic patients and a time from symptom onset to treatment <4 days can shorten the duration of viral shedding.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Shi-feng Shao, E-mail: shaoshifeng123@outlook.com

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These authors made equal contributions.

Present address: Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin 300350, China

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

Analysis of factors affecting the prognosis of COVID-19 patients and viral shedding duration

  • Jing Han (a1) (a2), Li-xia Shi (a1) (a3), Yi Xie (a2), Yong-jin Zhang (a1), Shu-ping Huang (a1), Jian-guo Li (a3), He-rong Wang (a3) and Shi-feng Shao (a3) (a4)...

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