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An assessment of the microbiological quality of liver-based pâté in England 2012–13: comparison of samples collected at retail and from catering businesses

  • J. McLAUCHLIN (a1) (a2), F. JØRGENSEN (a3), H. AIRD (a4), A. CHARLETT (a5), N. ELVISS (a6), D. FENELON (a7), A. FOX (a8), C. WILLIS (a3) and C. F. L. AMAR (a9)...

Summary

The purpose of this study was to investigate the microbiological quality of liver pâté. During 2012–13, a total of 870 samples, unrelated to the investigation of food-poisoning outbreaks, were collected either at retail (46%), catering (53%) or the point of manufacture (1%) and were tested using standard methods to detect Salmonella spp. or Campylobacter spp., and to enumerate for Listeria spp., including Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, coagulase-positive staphylococci including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus spp., including Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteriaceae, and aerobic colony counts (ACCs). Seventy-three percent of samples were of satisfactory microbiological quality, 18% were borderline and 9% unsatisfactory. Salmonella spp. or Campylobacter spp. was not recovered from any sample. The most common causes of unsatisfactory results were elevated ACCs (6% of the samples) and high Enterobacteriaceae counts (4% of samples). The remaining unsatisfactory results were due to elevated counts of: E. coli (three samples); B. cereus (one sample at 2·6 × 105 cfu/g); or L. monocytogenes (one sample at 2·9 × 103 cfu/g). Pâté from retail was less likely to be contaminated with L. monocytogenes than samples collected from catering and samples from supermarkets were of significantly better microbiological quality than those from catering establishments.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: J. McLauchlin, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Ave, London NW9 5EQ, UK. (Email: Jim.mclauchlin@phe.gov.uk)

References

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An assessment of the microbiological quality of liver-based pâté in England 2012–13: comparison of samples collected at retail and from catering businesses

  • J. McLAUCHLIN (a1) (a2), F. JØRGENSEN (a3), H. AIRD (a4), A. CHARLETT (a5), N. ELVISS (a6), D. FENELON (a7), A. FOX (a8), C. WILLIS (a3) and C. F. L. AMAR (a9)...

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