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Alcohol consumption and persistent infection of high-risk human papillomavirus

  • H. Y. OH (a1), M. K. KIM (a1), S. SEO (a2), D. O. LEE (a2), Y. K. CHUNG (a3), M. C. LIM (a2), J. KIM (a2), C. W. LEE (a3) and S. PARK (a2)...

Summary

Alcohol consumption is a possible co-factor of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) persistence, a major step in cervical carcinogenesis, but the association between alcohol and continuous HPV infection remains unclear. This prospective study identified the association between alcohol consumption and HR-HPV persistence. Overall, 9230 women who underwent screening during 2002–2011 at the National Cancer Center, Korea were analysed in multivariate logistic regression. Current drinkers [odds ratio (OR) 2·49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·32–4·71] and drinkers for ⩾5 years (OR 2·33, 95% CI 1·17–4·63) had a higher risk of 2-year HR-HPV persistence (HPV positivity for 3 consecutive years) than non-drinkers and drinkers for <5 years, respectively (vs. HPV negativity for 3 consecutive years). A high drinking frequency (⩾twice/week) and a high beer intake (⩾3 glasses/occasion) had higher risks of 1-year (OR 1·80, 95% CI 1·01–3·36) HPV positivity for 2 consecutive years) and 2-year HR-HPV persistence (OR 3·62, 95% CI 1·35–9·75) than non-drinkers. Of the HPV-positive subjects enrolled, drinking habit (OR 2·68, 95% CI 1·10–6·51) and high consumption of beer or soju (⩾2 glasses/occasion; OR 2·90, 95% CI 1·06–7·98) increased the risk of 2-year consecutive or alternate HR-HPV positivity (vs. consecutive HPV negativity). These findings suggest that alcohol consumption might increase the risk of cervical HR-HPV persistence in Korean women.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Dr M. K. Kim, Translational Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, National Cancer Center, 111, Jungbalsan-ro, Madu-dong, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-769, Korea. (Email: alrud@ncc.re.kr)

References

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