Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Aetiological characteristics of adult acute diarrhoea in a general hospital of Shanghai

  • X. ZHAO (a1), B. NI (a1), Y. WANG (a1), X. SHEN (a1), C. ZHANG (a1), J. LIU (a1) and S. LI (a1)...

Summary

Epidemic surveillance is an effective means to determine the characteristics of acute diarrhoea and the benefits of disease control and prevention. The epidemiological, clinical, and aetiological data of adult (aged ⩾15 years) acute diarrhoea in a general hospital in Shanghai were collected and analysed. Out of 2430 acute diarrhoea patients, 162 subjects were sampled (sample ratio 15:1). The sampled subjects had an average age (±s.d.) of 44 ± 18 years; 142 (87·7%) had a history that indicated ingestion of contaminated food; and 40 (24·7%), 54 (33·3%), and 73 (45·1%) patients had diarrhoea that was attributed to viral, bacterial, and unknown aetiological origins respectively. Viral diarrhoea is mainly prevalent during the winter and spring months, while bacterial and diarrhoea of unknown aetiology occur mainly in the summer months. The average age of the unknown aetiology group (48 ± 19 years) was significantly older than that of the viral diarrhoea group (39 ± 16 years). The number of patients with vomiting in the viral group (30·6%) was significantly higher than that in the bacterial (17·1%) and unknown aetiology (8·2%) groups. Viral and bacterial infections are the main cause of acute diarrhoea in Shanghai. However, further effective technological means are needed to improve the surveillance, control, and prevention of acute diarrhoea.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Aetiological characteristics of adult acute diarrhoea in a general hospital of Shanghai
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Aetiological characteristics of adult acute diarrhoea in a general hospital of Shanghai
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Aetiological characteristics of adult acute diarrhoea in a general hospital of Shanghai
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: X. Zhao, MPH, Microbiology Laboratory, Centre for Disease Control and Prevention of Xuhui, 50 Yongchuan Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200237, China. (Email: 18918830193@189.cn)

References

Hide All
1. Thielman, NM, Guerrant, RL. Clinical practice. Acute infectious diarrhoea. New England Journal of Medicine 2004; 350: 3847.
2. Graves, NS. Acute gastroenteritis. Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice 2013; 40: 727741.
3. CDC Division of News and Electronic Media. Deaths from gastroenteritis double (http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2012/p0314_gastroenteritis.html). Accessed 30 June 2016.
4. Dickinson, B, Surawicz, CM. Infectious diarrhoea: an overview. Current Gastroenterology Reports 2014; 16: 399.
5. Matson, DO, Estes, MK. Impact of rotavirus infection at a large pediatric hospital. Journal of Infectious Diseases 1990; 162: 598604.
6. Tucker, AW, et al. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a rotavirus immunization program for the United States. Journal of the American Medical Association 1998; 279: 13711376.
7. Ahmed, SM, et al. Global prevalence of norovirus in cases of gastroenteritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Lancet Infectious Diseases 2014; 14: 725730.
8. Grimwood, K, Buttery, JP. Clinical update: rotavirus gastroenteritis and its prevention. Lancet 2007; 370: 302304.
9. Parashar, UD, et al. Global mortality associated with rotavirus disease among children in 2004. Journal of Infectious Diseases 2009; 200: S9S15.
10. Getto, L, Zeserson, E, Breyer, M. Vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, and gastroenteritis. Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America 2011; 29: 211237.
11. Cao, J, et al. Hepatitis A outbreaks in China during 2006: application of molecular epidemiology. Hepatology International 2009; 3: 356363.
12. Lu, J, et al. General epidemiological parameters of viral hepatitis A, B, C, and E in six regions of China: a cross-sectional study in 2007. PLoS ONE 2009; 4: e8467.
13. Campbell, RR, et al. Clostridium difficile in acute and long-stay elderly patients. Age Ageing 1988; 17: 333336.
14. Kim, J, et al. Epidemiological features of Clostridium difficile-associated disease among inpatients at children's hospitals in the United States, 2001–2006. Pediatrics 2008; 122: 1266–70.
15. McDonald, LC, Owings, M, Jernigan, DB. Clostridium difficile infection in patients discharged from US short-stay hospitals, 1996–2003. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2006; 12: 409415.
16. Zollner-Schwetz, I, Krause, R. Therapy of acute gastroenteritis: role of antibiotics. Clinical Microbiology and Infection 2015; 21: 744749.
17. Platts-Mills, JA, Operario, DJ, Houpt, ER. Molecular diagnosis of diarrhoea: current status and future potential. Current Infectious Disease Reports 2012; 14: 4146.
18. Soli, KW, et al. Detection of enteric viral and bacterial pathogens associated with paediatric diarrhoea in Goroka, Papua New Guinea. International Journal of Infectious Diseases 2014; 27: 5458.
19. Salwen, MJ, et al. Laboratory diagnosis of gastrointestinal and pancreatic disorders. In: McPherson, RA, Pincus, MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. Philadelphia: Saunders, 2011, chapter 22.
20. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Laboratory methods for the diagnosis of epidemic dysentery and cholera (www.cdc.gov/cholera/pdf/Laboratory-Methods-for-the-Diagnosis-of-Epidemic-Dysentery-and-Cholera.pdf. Accessed 4 April 2016.
21. Kaper, JB, Nataro, JP, Mobley, HL. Pathogenic Escherichia coli . Nature Reviews Microbiology 2004; 2: 123140.
22. Tsolis, RM, et al. From bench to bedside: stealth of enteroinvasive pathogens. Nature Reviews Microbiology 2008; 6: 883892.
23. Snyder, JD, Merson, MH. The magnitude of the global problem of acute diarrheal disease: a review of active surveillance data. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 1982; 60: 605613.
24. Babji, S, et al. Multi-centre surveillance of rotavirus diarrhoea in hospitalized children ⩽5 years of age in India, 2009–2012. Vaccine 2014; 32: A1012.
25. Ahmed, SM, Lopman, BA, Levy, K. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the global seasonality of norovirus. PLoS ONE 2013; 8: e75922.
26. Das, SK, et al. Gastroenteritis due to typhoidal Salmonella: a decade of observation at an urban and a rural diarrheal disease hospital in Bangladesh. BMC Infectious 2014; 14: 435.
27. Ramig, RF. Pathogenesis of Intestinal and Systemic Rotavirus Infection. Journal of Virology 2004; 78: 1021310220.
28. Guerrant, RL, et al. Practice guidelines for the management of infectious diarrhoea. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2001; 32: 331351.

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed