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Acute gastroenteritis caused by multiple enteric pathogens in children

  • S.-Y. CHEN (a1) (a2), C.-N. TSAI (a2), H.-C. CHAO (a1), M.-W. LAI (a1), T.-Y. LIN (a3), T.-Y. KO (a2) and C.-H. CHIU (a3)...

Summary

Of 303 children hospitalized with acute non-bloody, non-mucoid diarrhoea, 69 (22·8%) had polymicrobial infection, including 52 (17·2%) multiple viral infection and 17 (5·6%) viral and bacterial co-infection. Rotavirus had the most important role in both categories; thus the control of rotavirus infection is crucial for maintaining children's health in Taiwan.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence: C.-H. Chiu, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Chang Gung Children's Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kweishan 333, Taoyuan, Taiwan. (Email: chchiu@adm.cgmh.org.tw)

References

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Keywords

Acute gastroenteritis caused by multiple enteric pathogens in children

  • S.-Y. CHEN (a1) (a2), C.-N. TSAI (a2), H.-C. CHAO (a1), M.-W. LAI (a1), T.-Y. LIN (a3), T.-Y. KO (a2) and C.-H. CHIU (a3)...

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