Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

India's Silent Valley and Its Threatened Rain-forest Ecosystems

  • J.S. Singh (a1), S.P. Singh (a2), A.K. Saxena (a3) and Y.S. Rawat (a4)

Extract

Most of the features that are commonly attributed to typical tropical rain-forests, such as a preponderance of woody vegetation and species with leaves in the mesophyll size-class, tall slender trees with ‘flying buttress’ and unusually thin bark, multilayering of vegetation with abundance of epiphytes and stranglers, evergreenness, strong tendency to change in species composition in time and space, and high diversity of dominance, are plentifully displayed by the forests of the Silent Valley in southwestern India. A relatively high species-richness, remarkably thin bark of trees, and high total tree-basal area, indicate that the valley embodies a virgin forest and that conditions for growth are very favourable. Because of the terrain, heterogeneity in habitats is well marked.

The proposed construction of a dam and large flooding reservoir threatens to bring about several undesirable alterations in the environment of the Silent Valley rain- and riparian forests, and the disturbances that would follow such construction and flooding would be highly detrimental to the diversity of the forests and to the complexity of their structure. Hence a plea is made for the setting aside forthwith of a proposed major ‘Silent Valley Biosphere Reserve’, which could safeguard a unique part of the world's genetical heritage and one of its most interesting complexes of natural ecosystems.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Ashton, P.S. (1976). Factors affecting the development and conservation of tree genetic resources in South-east Asia. Pp. 189–98 in Tropical Trees: Variation, Breeding and Conservation (Ed. Burley, J. & Styles, B.T.). Academic Press, London & New York. [Reprint only available.]
Chandrashekharan, C. (1973). Forest Resources of Kerala: A Quantitative Assessment. Kerala Forest Department, Trivandrum, Kerala, India: 245 pp.
Cody, M.L. (1968). On the methods of resource divisions in grassland bird communities. Amer. Nat., 102, pp. 107–47.
Dasmann, R.F., Milton, J.P. & Freeman, P.H. (1974). Ecological Principles for Economic Development. John Wiley & Sons, London, England, UK: ix + 252 pp., illustr.
Eisenberg, J.F. (1980). The diversity of biomass of tropical mammals. Pp. 3555 in Conservation Biology (Ed. Soule, M.E. & Wilcox, B.A.). Sinauer Associated, Sunderland, Massachusetts, USA: 395 pp.
Farnworth, E.G. & Golley, F.B. (1974). Fragile Ecosystem: Evaluation of Research and Applications in the Neotropics. Springer-Verlag, New York, NY, USA: xxvi + 258 pp.
Farver, M.T. & Milton, J.P. (1972). The Careless Technology: Ecology and International Development. Doubleday, Natural History Press, New York, NY, USA: 1030 pp.
Foster, R.B. (1980). Heterogeneity and disturbance in tropical vegetation. Pp. 7592 in Conservation Biology (Ed. Soule, M.E. & Wilcox, B.A.). Sinauer Associated, Sunderland, Massachusetts, USA: 395 pp.
Gadgil, M. (1979). Hills, dams and forests: Some field observations from the Western Ghats. Proc. Indian Acad. Sci., 2(3), pp. 291303.
Gilbert, L.E. (1980). Foodwebs organization and the conservation of neotropical diversity. Pp. 1133 in Conservation Biology (Ed. Soule, M.E. & Wilcox, B.A.). Sinauer Associated, Sunderland, Massachusetts, USA: 395 pp.
Hartshorn, G.S. (1978). Tree falls and tropical forest dynamics. Pp. 617–38 in Tropical Trees as Living Systems (Ed. Tomlinson, P.B. & Zimmermann, M.H.). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England UK. [Reprint only available.]
Heksira, G.P. (1981). The green revolution confronted with the world conservation strategy: Towards a conservation strategy to retain world food and Biosphere options. Ecoscripts, 14, pp. 137.
Herrera, R., Jordan, C.F., Medina, E. & Kilinge, H. (1981). How human activities disturb the nutrient cycles of a tropical rain-forest in Amazonia. Ambio, 10, pp. 109–14.
Jordan, C.F. & Medina, E. (1977). Ecosystem research in the tropics. Ann. Missouri Bot. Gard., 64, pp. 737–45.
Khadi and Village Industries Commission (1975). Gobar Gas, Why and How. Khadi and Village Industries Commission, Bombay, India: [not available for checking].
Kramer, F. (1926). Onderzock naar de natuurlijke verjonging in uitkap in preanger gebergtebosch. Med. Proefst. Boschw. Bogor, 14. [Not available for checking.]
Kramer, F. (1933). De natuurlijke verjonging in het Goenoeng Gredeh complex. Tectona, 26, pp. 156–85.
Lengerke, H.J. von (1977). The Nilgiris: Weather and Climate of a Mountain Area in South India, (Beitrage Zur Sudasienforschung 32.) Steiner Verlag, Wiesbaden, West Germany: xviii + 340 pp., illustr.
Lovejoy, T.E. & Oren, D. (1981). The minimum critical size of ecosystems. Pp. 713 in Forest Island Dynamics in Mandominated Landscapes (Ed. Burgess, R.L. & Sharpe, D.M.). Springer-Verlag, New York, NY, USA: [only reprint available].
Lovejoy, T.E., Bierregaard, R.O., Rankin, J.M. & Schubart, H.O.R. (1983). Ecological dynamics of tropical forest fragments. Pp. 378–84 in Tropical Rain Forest: Ecology and Management (Ed. Sutton, S.L., Whitmore, T.C. & Chadwick, A.C.). Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, England, UK: xiii + 498 pp., illustr.
MacArthur, R.H. & MacArthur, J. (1961). On bird species diversity. Ecology, 42, pp. 594–8.
Medway, Lord (1969). The Wild Mammals of Malaya. Oxford University Press, Kuala Lampur, Malaysia: [not available for checking].
Myers, N. (1979). The Sinking Ark. Pergamon Press, Oxford, England, UK: xiii + 307 pp.
Myers, N. (1980). The present status and future prospects of Tropical Moist Forests. Environmental Conservation, 7(2), pp. 101–14.
Nair, P.V., Sukumar, R. & Gadgil, M. (1980). The elephant in south India: A review. Pp. 919 in The Asian Elephant in the Indian Sub-continent. IUCN/SSC Report [not available for checking].
Ng, F.S.P. (1980). Germination ecology of Malaysian woody plants. Malaysian Forester, 43, pp. 406–37.
Ng, F.S.P. (1983). Ecological principles of tropical lowland rainforest conservation. Pp. 359–75 in Tropical Rain Forest: Ecology and Management (Ed. Sutton, S.L., Whitmore, T.C. & Chadwick, A.C.). Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, England, UK: xiii + 498 pp., illustr.
Oza, G.M. (1981). Save Silent Valley as a World Heritage Site? Environmental Conservation, 8(1), p. 52.
Poore, M.E.D. (1968). Studies in Malaysian rain-forest, I: The forest on the Triassic sediments in Jengka Forest Reserve. J. Ecol., 56, pp. 143–96.
Ramakrishnan, P.S. (1984). The need to conserve Silent Valley and Tropical Rain-forest Ecosystems in India. Environmental Conservation, 11(2), pp. 170–1.
Richards, P.W. (1952). The Tropical Rain Forest: An Ecological Study. Cambridge University Press, London, England, UK: xviii + 450 pp., illustr.
Singh, J.S., Singh, S.P., Saxena, A.K. & Rawat, Y.S. (in press). The forest vegetation of Silent Valley, India. In Tropical Rain Forest: Ecology and Management (Ed. A.C. Chadwick & S.L. Sutton). Leeds Philosophical and Literary Society, Leeds, England, U.K.
Stehli, F.G., Douglas, R.G. & Newell, N.D. (1969). Generation and maintenance of gradients in taxonomic diversity. Science, 164, pp. 947–9.
Swaminathan, M.S. (1983). The Silent Valley development with eco-conservation. Pp. 115–27 in Himalayas: Mountains and Men—Studies in Ecodevelopment (Ed. Singh, T.V. & Kaur, J.). Print House, Lucknow, India: xvi + 509 pp., illustr.
Whittaker, R.H. (1975). Communities and Ecosystems. Macmillan Publishing Co., New York, NY, USA: 385 pp.
Whittaker, R.H. & Likens, G.E. (1975). The Biosphere and Man. Pp. 305–28 in Primary Productivity of The Biosphere (Ed. Lieth, H. & Whittaker, R.H.). Springer-Verlag, New York, NY, USA: vi + 339 pp., illustr.
Wilson, E.O. & Willis, E.O. (1975). Applied biogeography. Pp. 522–34 in Ecology and Evolution of Communities (Ed. Cody, M.L. & Diamond, J.M.). Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: [reprint only available].
Woodwell, G.M., Whittaker, R.H., Reiners, W.A., Likens, G.E., Delwiche, C.C. & Botkin, D.B. (1978). The biota and the world carbon budget. Science, 199, pp. 141–6.

India's Silent Valley and Its Threatened Rain-forest Ecosystems

  • J.S. Singh (a1), S.P. Singh (a2), A.K. Saxena (a3) and Y.S. Rawat (a4)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed