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A decade of European field trials with genetically modified plants

  • Karine Lheureux (a1) and Klaus Menrad (a2)

Abstract

This article analyzes the development of notifications of genetically modified plants field trials in the European Union from 1991 to 2001, based on the data collected at the European level in the Summary Notification Information Format database. During this time period, a total of 1687 field trial notifications were received. The number of field trial notifications dropped by 76% between 1998 and 2001, mainly due to the de facto moratorium in place since 1999. Input traits (77%) dominated the field trial notifications during the last decade, while output traits were relevant in only 18% of all notifications, with a decreasing relevance during the last six years. In particular, field trial notifications on molecular farming were almost absent in the EU. Large companies focused their field trials on crops with a high grown area in the European Union and resistance traits, while public institutions showed interest in a large diversity of plants and traits. Finally, some conclusions on future impacts of the results of the study are drawn in this article.

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References

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A decade of European field trials with genetically modified plants

  • Karine Lheureux (a1) and Klaus Menrad (a2)

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