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Laoshi, zao shang hao! Good morning, teacher?

Respecting cultural differences when greeting a teacher

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2016

Extract

Terms of address are universally seen as a tool used to build social relations between speakers and hearers. Terms of address ‘help establish or maintain social bonds, strengthen solidarity and control social distance’ (Gu, 1990: 249), although ways of addressing vary from culture to culture. Therefore, the proper choice of address terms is a prerequisite for a successful interaction. Inappropriate use of address terms may lead to misunderstandings and hinder communication.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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