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China English, at home and in the world

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 July 2005

Hu Xiaoqiong
Affiliation:
Associate Professor in the College of Foreign Languages, Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002, Hubei, China. huxiaoqiong@ctgu.edu.cn

Abstract

First describing the rapid growth of English as a lingua franca in Europe and East Asia, and having drawn attention to similarities and differences in the evolution of the varieties of English worldwide, the author focuses on China where, as in so many other domains, growth and change are currently very rapid. She reports in particular on an investigation into 586 Chinese English teachers' attitudes to both the standard varieties of the language around the world and a new variety, China English. A majority of the teachers surveyed considers that China English will eventually become a standard variety of the language in its own right, and at least stand alongside the current national favourite, American English. In addition, the teachers' views on both the cultural content of teaching materials and the use of native speakers of English in Chinese institutions of education reflect both China's openness to the world and a strong adherence to its own culture. The signs are, she argues, that China English is on its way to becoming another world variety, which will happen when it has been adequately described, codified and officially recognized.

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Original Article
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

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