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Interventions for child and youth anxiety disorders: Involving parents, teachers, and peers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2019

Paula M. Barrett*
Affiliation:
Griffith University
*
School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, PMB 50, Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 4217, Email address: p.barrett@mailbox.gu.edu.au
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Abstract

Child and youth anxiety are the most common problem experienced during the school years. We know that we can effectively treat and prevent childhood anxiety by using individual, group, and community-based interventions that involve parents, peers, and educators. Recent research has shown that children who experience anxiety often develop depression in adolescence. Therefore, it is important to disseminate anxiety Intervention strategies both for the prevention of anxiety and, in the longer term, of depression Problems. Australia is a leading country in the development, evaluation, and Implementation ofsuch strategies. This paper describes, in detail, a community-based Intervention program.

Type
Special Section: Child anxiety programs
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1999

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