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Implications of the Newark Supergroup-based astrochronology and geomagnetic polarity time scale (Newark-APTS) for the tempo and mode of the early diversification of the Dinosauria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2011

Paul E. Olsen
Affiliation:
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, New York, NY 10964 USA Email: polsen@ldeo.columbia.edu
Dennis V. Kent
Affiliation:
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, New York, NY 10964 USA Email: polsen@ldeo.columbia.edu Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 USA Email: dvk@rci.rutgers.edu
Jessica H. Whiteside
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 USA Email: Jessica_Whiteside@brown.edu

Abstract

The Newark-APTS established a high-resolution framework for the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic. Palaeomagnetic polarity correlations to marine sections show that stage-level correlations of continental sequences were off by as much as 10 million years. New U–Pb ages show the new correlations and the Newark basin astrochronology to be accurate. Correlation of Newark-APTS to the Chinle Formation/Dockum Group, Glen Canyon Group, Fleming Fjord Formation and Ischigualasto Formation led to the following conclusions: (1) there are no unequivocal Carnian-age dinosaurs; (2) the Norian Age was characterised by a slowly increasing saurischian diversity but no unequivocal ornithischians; (3) there was profound Norian and Rhaetian continental provinciality; (4) the classic Chinle-, Germanic- and Los Colorados-type assemblages may have persisted to the close of the Rhaetian; (5) the distinct genus-level biotic transition traditionally correlated with the marine Carnian–Norian is in fact mid-Norian in age and within published error of the Manicouagan impact; (6) the end-Triassic marine and continental extinctions as seen in eastern North America were contemporaneous; and (7) compared to Triassic communities, Hettangian and Sinemurian age terrestrial communities were nearly globally homogenous and of low diversity. Consequently, the complex emerging picture of dinosaur diversification demands biostratigraphically-independent geochronologies in each of the faunally-important regions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 2011

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Implications of the Newark Supergroup-based astrochronology and geomagnetic polarity time scale (Newark-APTS) for the tempo and mode of the early diversification of the Dinosauria
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Implications of the Newark Supergroup-based astrochronology and geomagnetic polarity time scale (Newark-APTS) for the tempo and mode of the early diversification of the Dinosauria
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Implications of the Newark Supergroup-based astrochronology and geomagnetic polarity time scale (Newark-APTS) for the tempo and mode of the early diversification of the Dinosauria
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