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Diverse vertebrate assemblage of the Kilmaluag Formation (Bathonian, Middle Jurassic) of Skye, Scotland

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2020

Elsa PANCIROLI
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OxfordOX1 3AN, UK National Museum of Scotland, Chambers St, EdinburghEH1 1JF, UK School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, Kings Buildings, EdinburghEH9 3FE, UK
Roger B. J. BENSON
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OxfordOX1 3AN, UK
Stig WALSH
Affiliation:
National Museum of Scotland, Chambers St, EdinburghEH1 1JF, UK School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, Kings Buildings, EdinburghEH9 3FE, UK
Richard J. BUTLER
Affiliation:
School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, BirminghamB15 2TT, UK
Tiago Andrade CASTRO
Affiliation:
School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Grant Institute, Kings Buildings, EdinburghEH9 3FE, UK
Marc E. H. JONES
Affiliation:
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, LondonWC1E 6BT, UK
Susan E. EVANS
Affiliation:
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, LondonWC1E 6BT, UK
Corresponding

Abstract

The Kilmaluag Formation on the Isle of Skye, Scotland, provides one of the richest Mesozoic vertebrate fossil assemblages in the UK, and is among the richest globally for Middle Jurassic tetrapods. Since its discovery in 1971, this assemblage has predominantly yielded small-bodied tetrapods, including salamanders, choristoderes, lepidosaurs, turtles, crocodylomorphs, pterosaurs, dinosaurs, non-mammalian cynodonts and mammals, alongside abundant fish and invertebrates. It is protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest and by Nature Conservancy Order. Unlike contemporaneous localities from England, this assemblage yields associated partial skeletons, providing unprecedented new data. We present a comprehensive updated overview of the Kilmaluag Formation, including its geology and the fossil collections made to date, with evidence of several species occurrences presented here for the first time. We place the vertebrate faunal assemblage in an international context through comparisons with relevant contemporaneous localities from the UK, Europe, Africa, Asia and the US. This wealth of material reveals the Kilmaluag Formation as a vertebrate fossil assemblage of global significance, both in terms of understanding Middle Jurassic faunal composition and the completeness of specimens, with implications for the early evolutionary histories of mammals, squamates and amphibians.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Royal Society of Edinburgh

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