Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Emergency Organization of Child Psychiatric Care Following the Terrorist Attack on July 14, 2016, in Nice, France

  • Lucie Chauvelin (a1) (a2), Morgane Gindt (a1) (a2), Bertrand Olliac (a3), Philippe Robert (a2), Susanne Thümmler (a1) (a2) and Florence Askenazy (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

In the actual context of terrorism targeting children and families, it seems essential to describe different experiences of pediatric psychological emergency devices after such unexpected mass trauma. Here we testify our experience of the psychological emergency care setup dedicated to children and families during the first 48 hours after the terrorist attack of Nice, France, on July 14, 2016. Activated within the hour following the attack, the device included two child psychiatry teams turning over each day, receiving at least 163 individuals (99 children and 64 adults) within the first 2 days. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2019;13:144–146)

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to Dr Florence Askenazy, Service Universitaire de Psychiatrie de l’Enfant et de l’Adolescent, Hôpitaux Pédiatriques de Nice CHU-Lenval, 57 Avenue de la Californie, 06200, Nice, France (e-mail: askenazy.f@pediatrie-chulenval-nice.fr).

References

Hide All
1. Santiago, PN, Ursano, RJ, Gray, CL, et al. A systematic review of PTSD prevalence and trajectories in DSM-5 defined trauma exposed populations: intentional and non-intentional traumatic events. PloS One. 2013;8:e59236.
2. Kessler, RC. Posttraumatic stress disorder: the burden to the individual and to society. J Clin Psychiatry. 2000;61(Suppl 5):4-12.
3. Cohen, JA, Bukstein, O, Walter, H, et al. Practice parameter for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2010;49:414-430.
4. Yates, TM, Dodds, MF, Sroufe, LA, Egeland, B. Exposure to partner violence and child behavior problems: a prospective study controlling for child physical abuse and neglect, child cognitive ability, socioeconomic status, and life stress. Dev Psychopathol. 2003;15:199-218.
5. Scheeringa, MS, Myers, L, Putnam, FW, Zeanah, CH. Diagnosing PTSD in early childhood: an empirical assessment of four approaches. J Trauma Stress. 2012;25:359-367.
6. Peltonen, K, Punamäki, RL. Preventive interventions among children exposed to trauma of armed conflict: a literature review. Aggress Behav. 2010;36:95-116.
7. Kearns, MC, Ressler, KJ, Zatzick, D, Rothbaum, BO. Early interventions for PTSD: a review. Depress Anxiety. 2012;29:833-842.
8. Cremniter, D, Laurent, A. [Psychiatric care in emergency victims]. Rev Prat. 2003;53:1517-1522.
9. Crocq, L. Special teams for medical/psychological intervention in disaster victims. World Psychiatry. 2002;1:154.
10. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5®). American Psychiatric Publishing; 2013.
11. Pfefferbaum, B, Newman, E, Nelson, SD. Mental health interventions for children exposed to disasters and terrorism. J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2014;24:24-31.

Keywords

Emergency Organization of Child Psychiatric Care Following the Terrorist Attack on July 14, 2016, in Nice, France

  • Lucie Chauvelin (a1) (a2), Morgane Gindt (a1) (a2), Bertrand Olliac (a3), Philippe Robert (a2), Susanne Thümmler (a1) (a2) and Florence Askenazy (a1) (a2)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed