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Disaster Medicine: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature From 2016

  • Ritu R. Sarin (a1), John L. Hick (a2) (a3), Alicia A. Livinski (a4), Jennifer Nieratko (a2), Meghan Treber (a2), Audrey Mazurek (a2), Shayne Brannman (a2), Paul Biddinger (a5), Jonathan Burstein (a1), Gregory Ciottone (a1), Scott Goldberg (a6), Andrew Milsten (a7), Ira Nemeth (a7) and Eric Goralnick (a6)...

Abstract

Objective:

The Society of Academic Emergency Medicine Disaster Medicine Interest Group, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response – Technical Resources, Assistance Center, and Information Exchange (ASPR TRACIE) team, and the National Institutes of Health Library searched disaster medicine peer-reviewed and gray literature to identify, review, and disseminate the most important new research in this field for academics and practitioners.

Methods:

MEDLINE/PubMed and Scopus databases were searched with key words. Additional gray literature and focused hand search were performed. A Level I review of titles and abstracts with inclusion criteria of disaster medicine, health care system, and disaster type concepts was performed. Eight reviewers performed Level II full-text review and formal scoring for overall quality, impact, clarity, and importance, with scoring ranging from 0 to 20. Reviewers summarized and critiqued articles scoring 16.5 and above.

Results:

Articles totaling 1176 were identified, and 347 were screened in a Level II review. Of these, 193 (56%) were Original Research, 117 (34%) Case Report or other, and 37 (11%) were Review/Meta-Analysis. The average final score after a Level II review was 11.34. Eighteen articles scored 16.5 or higher. Of the 18 articles, 9 (50%) were Case Report or other, 7 (39%) were Original Research, and 2 (11%) were Review/Meta-Analysis.

Conclusions:

This first review highlighted the breadth of disaster medicine, including emerging infectious disease outbreaks, terror attacks, and natural disasters. We hope this review becomes an annual source of actionable, pertinent literature for the emerging field of disaster medicine.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to Ritu R. Sarin, 33 Pond Avenue, Unit 1207, Brookline, MA 02445 (e-mail: rsarin@bidmc.harvard.edu).

References

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Disaster Medicine: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature From 2016

  • Ritu R. Sarin (a1), John L. Hick (a2) (a3), Alicia A. Livinski (a4), Jennifer Nieratko (a2), Meghan Treber (a2), Audrey Mazurek (a2), Shayne Brannman (a2), Paul Biddinger (a5), Jonathan Burstein (a1), Gregory Ciottone (a1), Scott Goldberg (a6), Andrew Milsten (a7), Ira Nemeth (a7) and Eric Goralnick (a6)...

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