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Dallas MegaShelter Medical Operations Response to Hurricane Harvey

  • E. Liang Liu (a1), Brandon Morshedi (a1), Brian L. Miller (a1), Ronna Miller (a1), S. Marshal Isaacs (a1), Raymond L. Fowler (a1), Wendy Chung (a2), Ruby Blum (a3), Breanne Ward (a4), John Carlo (a5), Halim Hennes (a6), Frank Webster (a7), Trish Perl (a8), Chris Noah (a9), Rob Monaghan (a10), Andrew H. Tran (a11), Fern Benitez (a1), Julie Graves (a1), Caitlin Kibbey (a1), Kelly R. Klein (a1) and Raymond E. Swienton (a1)...

Abstract

On August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey made landfall near Corpus Christi, Texas. The ensuing unprecedented flooding throughout the Texas coastal region affected millions of individuals.1 The statewide response in Texas included the sheltering of thousands of individuals at considerable distances from their homes. The Dallas area established large-scale general population sheltering as the number of evacuees to the area began to amass. Historically, the Dallas area is one familiar with “mega-sheltering,” beginning with the response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005.2 Through continued efforts and development, the Dallas area had been readying a plan for the largest general population shelter in Texas. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2019;13:33–37)

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to Raymond E. Swienton, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (email: beardogmd@aol.com).

References

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1. Gomez, L. Hurricane Harvey: 50 counties flooded, 30,000 people in shelters, 56,000 911 calls in just 15 hours. San Diego Union Tribune. http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/opinion/the-conversation/sd-hurricane-harvey-texas-flooding-displaces-thousands-20170828-htmlstory.html. Published Aug 28, 2017. Accessed September 25, 2017.
2. Eastman, AL, Rinnert, KJ, Nemeth, IR, et al. Alternate site surge capacity in times of public health disaster maintains trauma center and emergency department integrity: Hurricane Katrina. J Trauma. 2007;63(2):253-257.10.1097/TA.0b013e3180d0a70e
3. McLaughlin, E, Ellis, R, Sterling, J. Dallas preps ‘mega-shelter’ as Texas braces for more rain. CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/27/us/harvey-landfall/index.html. Published August 28, 2017. Accessed September 25, 2017.
4. Mace, SE, Doyle, CJ. Patients with access and functional needs in a disaster. South Med J. 2017;110(8):509-515. doi: 10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000679.
5. FEMA. Guidance on Planning for Integration of Functional Needs Support Services in General Population Shelters. https://www.fema.gov/pdf/about/odic/fnss_guidance.pdf Published November 2010. Accessed September 25, 2017.
6. Dietsche, E. 52 hospitals with the most ER visits. Beckers Hospital Review. http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/lists/50-hospitals-with-the-most-er-visits-2016.html. Published Mar 17, 2016. Accessed September 25, 2017.

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