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Red Alert: It Is Time to Strengthen the Medical Knowledge of Noncompressible Torso Hemorrhage Among Health-Care Workers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2021

Hua-yu Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Yong Guo
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Hao Tang
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Xiao-ying Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Dong Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Yu-zhuo Han
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Peng Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosurgery, Emergency Medical Center of Chongqing, Chongqing, China
Yang Li
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
Lian-yang Zhang*
Affiliation:
Department of Trauma Surgery, War Trauma Medical Center, State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, China
*
Corresponding author: Lian-Yang Zhang, Email: dpzhangly@163.com.

Abstract

Objective:

Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH) is a major challenge in prehospital bleeding control and is associated with high mortality. This study was performed to estimate medical knowledge and the perceived barriers to information acquisition among health-care workers (HCWs) regarding NCTH in China.

Methods:

A self-administered and validated questionnaire was distributed among 11 WeChat groups consisting of HCWs engaged in trauma, emergency, and disaster rescue.

Results:

A total of 575 HCWs participated in this study. In the knowledge section, the majority (87.1%) denied that successful hemostasis could be obtained by external compression. Regarding attitudes, the vast majority of HCWs exhibited positive attitudes toward the important role of NCTH in reducing prehospital preventable death (90.4%) and enthusiasm for continuous learning (99.7%). For practice, fewer than half of HCWs (45.7%) had heard of NCTH beforehand, only a minority (14.3%) confirmed they had attended relevant continuing education, and 16.3% HCWs had no access to updated medical information. The most predominant barrier to information acquisition was the lack of continuing training (79.8%).

Conclusions:

Knowledge and practice deficiencies do exist among HCWs. Obstacles to update medical information warrant further attention. Furthermore, education program redesign is also needed.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc

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