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Radiation Emergency Readiness Among US Medical Toxicologists: A Survey

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2020

Brian P. Murray*
Affiliation:
Emory University School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Atlanta, GA Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
Eungjae Kim
Affiliation:
Emory University (undergraduate), Atlanta, GA
Samuel A. Ralston
Affiliation:
Carl A. Darnall Army Medical Center, Emergency Medicine, Fort Hood, TX
Tim P. Moran
Affiliation:
Emory University School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Atlanta, GA
Carol Iddins
Affiliation:
Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site, Oak Ridge, TN
Ziad Kazzi
Affiliation:
Emory University School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Atlanta, GA
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to Brian Murray, Emory University School of Medicine, Emergency Medicine, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322 (e-mail: bpmurra@emory.edu).

Abstract

Introduction:

Large scale radiologic and nuclear disasters are rare; however, recent events such as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor emergency in Japan and current global political tensions have highlighted the need for health-care providers with expertise in managing radiation injuries. Medical Toxicologists have the ability to collaborate with other specialists in filling this critical role.

Methods:

We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the attitudes, experiences, and knowledge of medical toxicologists through the assistance of the American College of Medical Toxicology.

Results:

The survey was completed by 114 medical toxicologists during the enrollment period. Medical toxicologists who had a willingness to participate in radiologic or nuclear emergencies or who had taken care of patients contaminated with radioactive material were more likely to perform well on the knowledge assessment.

Conclusion:

We identified that there is a group of medical toxicologists who have the willingness, experience, and knowledge to help manage patients in the event of a radiologic or nuclear emergency.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc.

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