Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-9pqtr Total loading time: 10.542 Render date: 2021-04-18T14:09:48.188Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Evidence of cognitive visual problems in children with hydrocephalus: a structured clinical history-taking strategy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 May 1999

Mary Jane Houliston
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow, G3 8SJ, Scotland, UK.
Abdel H Taguri
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow, G3 8SJ, Scotland, UK.
Gordon N Dutton
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow, G3 8SJ, Scotland, UK.
Constantinos Hajivassiliou
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Surgery, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow, G3 8SJ, Scotland, UK.
Daniel G Young
Affiliation:
Department of Paediatric Surgery, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow, G3 8SJ, Scotland, UK.
Get access

Abstract

Damage to the occipital cortex in children can result in many complex disorders of cognitive visual function. A series of clinical questions, developed from the specific problems of a cohort of children with cortical visual impairment, was asked of the parents of 200 children with no history of cerebral pathology, aged 5 to 12 years. One hundred and ninety-two parents gave reliable consistent responses. The results show a progressive improvement in performance with age, culminating in few 11- and 12-year olds having frequent problems, apart from 8% having frequent difficulty with orientation in new surroundings and 2% having problems with simultaneous perception tasks. The parents of 52 children (aged 5 to 17 years) with shunted hydrocephalus were then asked the same set of questions. Evidence of cognitive visual problems was identified in 27 of these children of whom 16 manifested multiple difficulties. The disabilities identified by our study comprised problems with: shape recognition, simultaneous perception, perception of movement, colour perception, orientation, object recognition, and face recognition. The range, nature, and combinations of these disorders are presented in this paper.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 1999 Mac Keith Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 2
Total number of PDF views: 10 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 18th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Evidence of cognitive visual problems in children with hydrocephalus: a structured clinical history-taking strategy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Evidence of cognitive visual problems in children with hydrocephalus: a structured clinical history-taking strategy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Evidence of cognitive visual problems in children with hydrocephalus: a structured clinical history-taking strategy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *