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Cascading effects following intervention

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2010

Gerald R. Patterson
Affiliation:
Implementation Sciences International, Incorporated Oregon Social Learning Center
Marion S. Forgatch
Affiliation:
Implementation Sciences International, Incorporated Oregon Social Learning Center
David S. DeGarmo
Affiliation:
Oregon Social Learning Center
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Four different sources for cascade effects were examined using 9-year process and outcome data from a randomized controlled trial of a preventive intervention using the Parent Management Training—Oregon Model (PMTO™). The social interaction learning model of child antisocial behavior serves as one basis for predicting change. A second source addresses the issue of comorbid relationships among clinical diagnoses. The third source, collateral changes, describes events in which changes in one family member correlate with changes in another. The fourth component is based on the long-term effects of reducing coercion and increasing positive interpersonal processes within the family. New findings from the 9-year follow-up show that mothers experienced benefits as measured by standard of living (i.e., income, occupation, education, and financial stress) and frequency of police arrests. It is assumed that PMTO reduces the level of coercion, which sets the stage for a massive increase in positive social interaction. In effect, PMTO alters the family environment and thereby opens doors to healthy new social environments.

Type
Regular Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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