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High-Order Interpolation Algorithms for Charge Conservation in Particle-in-Cell Simulations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 June 2015

Jinqing Yu*
Affiliation:
Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, China
Xiaolin Jin*
Affiliation:
Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China
Weimin Zhou*
Affiliation:
Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, China
Bin Li*
Affiliation:
Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China
Yuqiu Gu*
Affiliation:
Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, China
*
Corresponding author.Email:yqgu@caep.ac.cn
Corresponding author.Email:yqgu@caep.ac.cn

Abstract

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High-order interpolation algorithms for charge conservation in Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations are presented. The methods are valid for the case that a particle trajectory is a zigzag line. The second-order and third-order algorithms which can be applied to any even-order and odd-order are discussed in this paper, respectively. Several test simulations are performed to demonstrate their validity in two-dimensional PIC code. Compared with the simulation results of one-order, high-order algorithms have advantages in computation precision and enlarging the grid scales which reduces the CPU time.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global Science Press Limited 2013

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