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Flow-Induced Acoustics in Corrugated Pipes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 August 2015

Mihaela Popescu
Affiliation:
Department of Process Technology, Flow Technology, SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, 7046 Trondheim, Norway
Stein Tore Johansen
Affiliation:
Department of Process Technology, Flow Technology, SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, 7046 Trondheim, Norway
Wei Shyy
Affiliation:
Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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Abstract

When gas flows through corrugated pipes, pressure waves interacting with vortex shedding can produce distinct tonal noise and structural vibration. Based on established observations, a model is proposed which couples an acoustic pipe and self-excited oscillations with vortex shedding over the corrugation cavities. In the model, the acoustic response of the corrugated pipe is simulated by connecting the lossless medium moving with a constant velocity with a source based on a discrete distribution of van der Pol oscillators arranged along the pipe. Our time accurate solutions exhibit dynamic behavior consistent with that experimentally observed, including the lock-in frequency of vortex shedding, standing waves and the onset fluid velocity capable of generating the lock-in.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global Science Press Limited 2011

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