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On the Ashkin–Teller Model and Tutte–Whitney Functions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2007

G. E. FARR
Affiliation:
Clayton School of Information Technology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia (e-mail: graham.farr@infotech.monash.edu.au)
Corresponding

Abstract

The partition functions of the Ising and Potts models in statistical mechanics are well known to be partial evaluations of the Tutte–Whitney polynomial of the appropriate graph. The Ashkin–Teller model generalizes the Ising model and the four-state Potts model, and has been extensively studied since its introduction in 1943. However, its partition function (even in the symmetric case) is not a partial evaluation of the Tutte–Whitney polynomial. In this paper, we show that the symmetric Ashkin–Teller partition function can be obtained from a generalized Tutte–Whitney function which is intermediate in a precise sense between the usual Tutte–Whitney polynomialof the graph and that of its dual.

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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006

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References

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