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Costs and benefits of neuroimaging research in obsessive-compulsive disorder: time to take stock

  • Jon E. Grant (a1) and Samuel R. Chamberlain (a2)
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Abstract

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Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Jon E. Grant, JD, MD, MPH, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, 5841 S. Maryland Avenue, MC 3077, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. (Email: jongrant@uchicago.edu)

References

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1. Fouche, JP, du Plessis, S, Hattingh, C, et al. Cortical thickness in obsessive-compulsive disorder: multisite mega-analysis of 780 brain scans from six centres. Br J Psychiatry. 2017; 210(1): 6774.
2. Simpson, HB, Huppert, JD, Petkova, E, Foa, EB, Liebowitz, MR. Response versus remission in obsessive-compulsive disorder. J Clin Psychiatry. 2006; 67(2): 269276.
3. Boedhoe, PS, Schmaal, L, Abe, Y, et al. Distinct subcortical volume alterations in pediatric and adult OCD: a worldwide meta- and mega-analysis. Am J Psychiatry. 2017; 174(1): 6069.
4. Norman, LJ, Carlisi, C, Lukito, S, et al. Structural and functional brain abnormalities in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder: a comparative meta-analysis. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016; 73(8): 815825.
5. McKay, D, Abramovitch, A, Abramowitz, JS, Deacon, B. Association and causation in brain imaging: the case of OCD. Am J Psychiatry. 2017; 174(6): 597.
6. Skapinakis, P, Caldwell, D, Hollingworth, W, et al. A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of pharmacological and psychological interventions for the management of obsessive-compulsive disorder in children/adolescents and adults. Health Technol Assess. 2016; 20(43): 1392.
7. Hoexter, MQ, Diniz, JB, Lopes, AC, et al. Orbitofrontal thickness as a measure for treatment response prediction in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Depress Anxiety. 2015; 32(12): 900908.

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