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Assessment in Work Productivity and the Relationship with Cognitive Symptoms (AtWoRC): primary analysis from a Canadian open-label study of vortioxetine in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD)

  • Pratap Chokka (a1), Joanna Bougie (a2), Emmanouil Rampakakis (a3) and Jean Proulx (a2)

Abstract

Objective

The Assessment in Work Productivity and the Relationship with Cognitive Symptoms (AtWoRC) study aimed to assess the association between cognitive symptoms and work productivity in gainfully employed patients receiving vortioxetine for a major depressive episode (MDE).

Methods

Patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and treated with vortioxetine independently of study enrollment were assessed over 52 weeks at visits that emulated a real-life setting. Patients were classified as those receiving vortioxetine as the first treatment for their current MDE (first treatment) or having shown inadequate response to a previous antidepressant (switch). The primary endpoint was the correlation between changes in patient-reported cognitive symptoms (20-item Perceived Deficits Questionnaire [PDQ-D-20]) and changes in work productivity loss (Work Limitations Questionnaire [WLQ]) at week 12. Additional assessments included changes in symptom and disease severity, cognitive performance, functioning, work loss, and safety.

Results

In the week 12 primary analysis, 196 eligible patients at 26 Canadian sites were enrolled, received at least one treatment dose, and attended at least one postbaseline study visit. This analysis demonstrated a significant, strong correlation between PDQ-D-20 and WLQ productivity loss scores (r=0.634; p<0.001), and this correlation was significant in both first treatment and switch patients (p<0.001). A weaker correlation between Digit Symbol Substitution Test and WLQ scores was found (r=−0.244; p=0.003).

Conclusion

At 12 weeks, improvements in cognitive dysfunction were significantly associated with improvements in workplace productivity in patients with MDD, suggesting a role for vortioxetine in functional recovery in MDD.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Address correspondence to: P. Chokka, Grey Nuns Community Hospital, 1100 Youville Drive West, Edmonton, Alberta T6L 5X8, Canada.(Email: pratapchokka@shaw.ca)

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