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Suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts in patients with obsessive-compulsive tic-related disorder vs obsessive-compulsive disorder: results of a multicenter Italian study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2020

Beatrice Benatti
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Silvia Ferrari
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Benedetta Grancini
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Nicolaja Girone
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Matteo Briguglio
Affiliation:
IRCCS Orthopedic Institute Galeazzi, Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Tourette Center, Milan, Italy
Donatella Marazziti
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Federico Mucci
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Liliana Dell’Osso
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Section of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
Orsola Gambini
Affiliation:
Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy “Aldo Ravelli” Center for Nanotechnology and Neurostimulation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Benedetta Demartini
Affiliation:
Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy “Aldo Ravelli” Center for Nanotechnology and Neurostimulation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Antonio Tundo
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychopathology, Rome, Italy
Roberta Necci
Affiliation:
Institute of Psychopathology, Rome, Italy
Domenico De Berardis
Affiliation:
NHS, Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, Hospital “G. Mazzini”, Teramo, Italy Department of Neuroscience, Imaging and Clinical Science, Chair of Psychiatry, University “G. D’Annunzio”, Chieti, Italy
Roberta Galentino
Affiliation:
IRCCS Orthopedic Institute Galeazzi, Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Tourette Center, Milan, Italy
Sara De Michele
Affiliation:
IRCCS Orthopedic Institute Galeazzi, Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Tourette Center, Milan, Italy
Umberto Albert
Affiliation:
Dipartimento Universitario Clinico di Scienze Mediche Chirurgiche e della Salute, Università degli Studi di Trieste, Trieste, Italy; SC Clinica Psichiatrica, Azienda Sanitaria Universitaria Giuliano-Isontina (ASUGI), Trieste, Italy
Sylvia Rigardetto
Affiliation:
San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
Giuseppe Maina
Affiliation:
San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
Giacomo Grassi
Affiliation:
Brain Center Firenze, Florence, Italy
Stefano Pallanti
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
Andrea Amerio
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy Mood Disorders Program, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Mario Amore
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
Alberto Priori
Affiliation:
Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy “Aldo Ravelli” Center for Nanotechnology and Neurostimulation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Domenico Servello
Affiliation:
IRCCS Orthopedic Institute Galeazzi, Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Tourette Center, Milan, Italy
Caterina Viganò
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Monica Bosi
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Anna Colombo
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Mauro Porta
Affiliation:
IRCCS Orthopedic Institute Galeazzi, Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Tourette Center, Milan, Italy
Bernardo Dell’Osso
Affiliation:
Luigi Sacco University Hospital, Psychiatry 2 Unit, University of Milan, Milan, Italy “Aldo Ravelli” Center for Nanotechnology and Neurostimulation, University of Milan, Milan, Italy Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA Centro per lo studio dei meccanismi molecolari alla base delle patologie neuro-psico-geriatriche”, University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tic disorder (TD) represent highly disabling, chronic and often comorbid psychiatric conditions. While recent studies showed a high risk of suicide for patients with OCD, little is known about those patients with comorbid TD (OCTD). Aim of this study was to characterize suicidal behaviors among patients with OCD and OCTD.

Methods.

Three hundred and thirteen outpatients with OCD (n = 157) and OCTD (n = 156) were recruited from nine different psychiatric Italian departments and assessed using an ad-hoc developed questionnaire investigating, among other domains, suicide attempt (SA) and ideation (SI). The sample was divided into four subgroups: OCD with SA (OCD-SA), OCD without SA (OCD-noSA), OCTD with SA (OCTD-SA), and OCTD without SA (OCTD-noSA).

Results.

No differences between groups were found in terms of SI, while SA rates were significantly higher in patients with OCTD compared to patients with OCD. OCTD-SA group showed a significant male prevalence and higher unemployment rates compared to OCD-SA and OCD-noSA sample. Both OCTD-groups showed an earlier age of psychiatric comorbidity onset (other than TD) compared to the OCD-SA sample. Moreover, patients with OCTD-SA showed higher rates of other psychiatric comorbidities and positive psychiatric family history compared to the OCD-SA group and to the OCD-noSA groups. OCTD-SA and OCD-SA samples showed higher rates of antipsychotics therapies and treatment resistance compared to OCD-noSA groups.

Conclusions.

Patients with OCTD vs with OCD showed a significantly higher rate of SA with no differences in SI. In particular, OCTD-SA group showed different unfavorable epidemiological and clinical features which need to be confirmed in future prospective studies.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts in patients with obsessive-compulsive tic-related disorder vs obsessive-compulsive disorder: results of a multicenter Italian study
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