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Sexual Addiction and Compulsion: Recognition, Treatment, and Recovery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

The management of patients with compulsive sexual behavior requires an understanding of the profile of the sexually compulsive or addicted patient. This article summarizes patient characteristics and their implications for treatment. Data from a study of the recovery of 957 patients who had problematic, sexually excessive behavior are presented. Spanning 5 years, the study shows six distinct stages patients experienced and the clinical activities that were most useful to them. A trajectory of a typical diagnosis and treatment path is provided, as well as important resources for physicians and patients.

Type
Grand Rounds
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2000

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References

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