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Role of α1 adrenergic antagonism in the mechanism of action of iloperidone: reducing extrapyramidal symptoms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 December 2013

Abstract

ISSUE:The low incidence of extrapyramidal side effects associated with the atypical antipsychotic iloperidone may be linked to its unique binding profile of high affinity antagonism of both α1 adrenergic receptors and serotonin 2A receptors.

Type
Brainstorms
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2013 

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Role of α1 adrenergic antagonism in the mechanism of action of iloperidone: reducing extrapyramidal symptoms
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