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Presence of Irritability During Depressive Episodes in Bipolar Disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

Background:This study examined the prevalence of irritability in patients with bipolar I disorder during an episode of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) major depression who do not meet criteria for a mixed episode.

Method:A chart review of 111 patients with bipolar I disorder treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital Bipolar Clinic between 1998 and 2000 identified 34 patients who met criteria for a DSM-IV major depressive episode in the absence of (1) mood elevation and/or (2) irritability associated with any additional above threshold DSM-IV symptoms of mania. Data gathered from the charts utilized prospective ratings made routinely at each clinic visit using the Clinical Monitoring Form (CMF), a structured assessment instrument which includes modified versions of the mood modules of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Data from these 34 patients were reviewed to determine the presence of irritability.

Results:The frequency of abnormal irritability in these 34 patients followed a bimodal distribution: 26% of the patients showed abnormal irritability ≥75% of the time, compared with 68% of the patients with abnormal irritabihty ≤30% of the time. Of the high-irritability patients, psychomotor agitation was rated as definitely present to a significant degree in 44%. Talkativeness and distractibility were rated present but subthreshold in one patient each. All other symptoms of DSM-IV mania were absent.

Conclusion:Approximately 25% of patients with bipolar I disorder who meet criteria for a DSM-IV major depressive episode also experienced substantial irritability in the absence of associated symptoms of mania. Our results suggest that abnormal irritability is not limited to mania or mixed states.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

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