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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder With and Without Tic Disorder: A Comparative Study From India

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2014

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence from phenomenological, family, genetic, and treatment studies from Western centers have suggested that tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) could be different from non-tic-related OCD. This study from India investigated the differences in OCD with and without tics, with respect to sociode-mographics, symptom profile, and comorbidity, including obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders, to examine whether the clinical profile of tic-related OCD is similar to that reported previously.

Methods: Fifty subjects with OCD and tics (chronic motor tics and Tourette syndrome) were compared with 141 OCD subjects without tics.

Results: Subjects having OCD with tics tended to be males, and had an earlier onset of illness. They had more of symmetry/aggressive and religious obsessions, and cleaning, ordering/arranging, hoarding, and repeating compulsions and were associated with trichotillomania and hypochondraisis. Stepwise backward (Wald) regression analysis showed that an early age of onset, male gender, aggressive obsessions, cleaning compulsions, and trichotillomania were significantly associated with tic-related OCD.

Conclusion: The findings of this study from India are broadly similar to those reported previously from the West indicating the universality of differences in tic- and non-tic-related OCD. Our findings also support the existing evidence that tics contribute to the heterogeneity of OCD.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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