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Do pathological gambling and obsessive-compulsive disorder overlap? a neurocognitive perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2012

Ji-Won Hur
Affiliation:
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea
Na young Shin
Affiliation:
Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea
Sung Nyun Kim
Affiliation:
Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Joon Hwan Jang
Affiliation:
Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Jung-Seok Choi
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea
Young-Chul Shin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Jun Soo Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Clinical Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Institute of Human Behavioral Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective

Pathological gambling (PG) is a severe and persistent pattern of problem gambling that has been aligned with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, no study has compared the neurocognitive profiles of individuals with PG and OCD.

Methods

We compared neurocognitive functioning, including executive function, verbal learning and memory, and visual–spatial organization and memory among 16 pathological gamblers, 31 drug-naïve OCD subjects, and 52 healthy controls.

Results

The only neurocognitive marker common to both groups was increased fragmentation errors on the Rey–Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (ROCF). The PG subjects showed increased nonperseverative error on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and organization difficulties in the ROCF, whereas the OCD subjects revealed longer response times on the Stroop test and retention difficulties on the immediate recall scale of the ROCF.

Conclusions

A more careful approach is required in considering whether PG is a part of the OCD spectrum, as little evidence of neurocognitive overlap between PG and OCD has been reported.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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