Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-j5sqr Total loading time: 0.245 Render date: 2022-10-02T04:26:29.725Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Anhedonia and cognitive function in adults with MDD: results from the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 December 2015

Roger S. McIntyre*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Hanna O. Woldeyohannes
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Joanna K. Soczynska
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nadia A. Maruschak
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Ida K. Wium-Andersen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatric Center, Copenhagen, Denmark
Maj Vinberg
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Psychiatric Center, Copenhagen, Denmark
Danielle S. Cha
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Yena Lee
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Holly X. Xiao
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Laura Ashley Gallaugher
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Roman M. Dale
Affiliation:
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Mohammad T. Alsuwaidan
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Rodrigo B. Mansur
Affiliation:
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
David J. Muzina
Affiliation:
Turn2Health Solutions, Willoughby, Ohio, USA
Andre F. Carvalho
Affiliation:
Translational Psychiatry Research Group and Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza, Brazil
Jeanette M. Jerrell
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Sidney H. Kennedy
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
*
*Address for correspondence: Dr. Roger S. McIntyre, MD, FRCPC, Professor of Psychiatry and Pharmacology, University of Toronto, Head, Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 2S8. (Email: roger.mcintyre@uhn.ca)

Abstract

Background

Cognitive dysfunction is common in major depressive disorder (MDD) and a critical determinant of health outcome. Anhedonia is a criterion item toward the diagnosis of a major depressive episode (MDE) and a well-characterized domain in MDD. We sought to determine the extent to which variability in self-reported cognitive function correlates with anhedonia.

Method

A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from (N=369) participants with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR)-defined diagnosis of MDD who were enrolled in the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project (IMDCP) between January 2008 and July 2013. The IMDCP is a collaborative research platform at the Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, and the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. Measures of cognitive function, anhedonia, and depression severity were analyzed using linear regression equations.

Results

A total of 369 adults with DSM-IV-TR–defined MDD were included in this analysis. Self-rated cognitive impairment [ie, as measured by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS)] was significantly correlated with a proxy measure of anhedonia (r=0.131, p=0.012). Moreover, total depression symptom severity, as measured by the total Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score, was also significantly correlated with self-rated measures of cognitive dysfunction (r=0.147, p=0.005). The association between anhedonia and self-rated cognitive dysfunction remained significant after adjusting for illness severity (r=0.162, p=0.007).

Conclusions

These preliminary results provide empirical data for the testable hypothesis that anhedonia and self-reported cognitive function in MDD are correlated yet dissociable domains. The foregoing observation supports the hypothesis of overlapping yet discrete neurobiological substrates for these domains.

Type
Opinion
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2015 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. McIntyre, RS, Cha, DS, Soczynska, JK, et al. Cognitive deficits and functional outcomes in major depressive disorder: determinants, substrates, and treatment interventions. Depress Anxiety. 2013; 30(6): 515527.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
2. Millan, MJ, Agid, Y, Brune, M, et al. Cognitive dysfunction in psychiatric disorders: characteristics, causes and the quest for improved therapy. Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2012; 11(2): 141168.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3. Roiser, JP, Sahakian, BJ. Hot and cold cognition in depression. CNS Spectr. 2013; 18(3): 139149.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Mitterschiffthaler, MT, Kumari, V, Malhi, GS, et al. Neural response to pleasant stimuli in anhedonia: an fMRI study. Neuroreport . 2003; 14(2): 177182.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5. Pizzagalli, DA. Depression, stress, and anhedonia: toward a synthesis and integrated model. Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2014; 10: 393423.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Martinotti, G, Sepede, G, Gambi, F, et al. Agomelatine versus venlafaxine XR in the treatment of anhedonia in major depressive disorder: a pilot study. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2012; 32(4): 487491.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Insel, T, Cuthbert, B, Garvey, M, et al. Research domain criteria (RDoC): toward a new classification framework for research on mental disorders. Am J Psychiatry. 2010; 167(7): 748751.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Stein, DJ. Depression, anhedonia, and psychomotor symptoms: the role of dopaminergic neurocircuitry. CNS Spectr. 2008; 13(7): 561565.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
9. Santangelo, G, Vitale, C, Trojano, L, et al. Relationship between depression and cognitive dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease without dementia. J Neurol. 2009; 256(4): 632638.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. Kim, JH, Lee, EH, Joung, YS. The WHO Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale: reliability and validity of the Korean version. Psychiatry Investig. 2013; 10(1): 4146.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11. Kessler, RC, Adler, L, Ames, M, et al. The World Health Organization Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS): a short screening scale for use in the general population. Psychol Med. 2005; 35(2): 245256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Hanson, JA, Haub, MD, Walker, JJ, Johnston, DT, Goff, BS, Dretsch, MN. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder subtypes and their relation to cognitive functioning, mood states, and combat stress symptomatology in deploying U.S. soldiers. Mil Med. 2012; 177(6): 655662.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13. Lawrence, C, Roy, A, Harikrishnan, V, Yu, S, Dabbous, O. Association between severity of depression and self-perceived cognitive difficulties among full-time employees. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2013; 15(3): PCC.12m01469.Google ScholarPubMed
14. Dantzer, R. Cytokine-induced sickness behaviour: a neuroimmune response to activation of innate immunity. Eur J Pharmacol. 2004; 500(1–3): 399411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15. Soczynska, JK, Kennedy, SH, Goldstein, BI, Lachowski, A, Woldeyohannes, HO, McIntyre, RS. The effect of tumor necrosis factor antagonists on mood and mental health-associated quality of life: novel hypothesis-driven treatments for bipolar depression? Neurotoxicology. 2009; 30(4): 497521.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16. Gorwood, P. Neurobiological mechanisms of anhedonia. Dialogues Clin Neurosci. 2008; 10(3): 291299.Google ScholarPubMed
17. Turner, AD, Capuano, AW, Wilson, RS, Barnes, LL. Depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in older African Americans: two scales and their factors. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2015; 23(6): 568578.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Anhedonia and cognitive function in adults with MDD: results from the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Anhedonia and cognitive function in adults with MDD: results from the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Anhedonia and cognitive function in adults with MDD: results from the International Mood Disorders Collaborative Project
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *