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Amygdalar Volume in Borderline Personality Disorder With and Without Comorbid Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: A Meta-analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2012

Claudia P. de-Almeida
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil
Amy Wenzel
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA
Camila S. de-Carvalho
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil
Vania B. Powell
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil
César Araújo-Neto
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil
Lucas C. Quarantini
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil
Irismar R. de-Oliveira
Affiliation:
Department of Neurosciences and Mental Health, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Brazil

Abstract

Introduction

Four studies have found a smaller amygdalar volume in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) relative to controls, whereas four other studies have found similar amygdalar volume in BPD patients relative to controls. This study aims to compare amygdalar volumes of BPD patients with controls, and also to compare BPD patients with and without post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with controls in order to determine whether PTSD can explain the heterogeneity of findings.

Method

Systematic review and meta-analysis of magnetic resonance imaging studies that measured amygdalar volumes in BPD patients and healthy controls.

Findings

A significant reduction of amygdalar volumes in BPD patients was confirmed (p < .001). However, data from the studies that discriminated BPD patients with and without PTSD indicated that amygdalar volumes were significantly smaller in BPD patients without PTSD relative to controls (left: p = .02; right: p = .05), but not in BPD patients with PTSD relative to controls (left: p = .08; right: p = .20).

Conclusion

This meta-analysis suggests that amygdalar volumes are reduced in patients with BPD. This pattern is confirmed in BPD patients without PTSD, but not in BPD patients with PTSD, raising the possibility that reduced amygdalar volume in BPD patients cannot be explained by comorbid PTSD.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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Amygdalar Volume in Borderline Personality Disorder With and Without Comorbid Post-traumatic Stress Disorder: A Meta-analysis
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